Mobile Applications

Native Apps

Native apps are specific (or “native”) to a given operating system, such as iOS, Android, or Windows. Native apps are only able to function on the specific system they are built for. A native app is first accessed after it is downloaded to the device. From then on, the app can be opened from the device’s home screen. Native app developers must be familiar with the specific code and framework for that operating system. For example, iOS apps are typically coded in Objective-C, whereas Android apps are usually coded with Java. If the same app is desired to function on multiple operating systems, each native app will need to be coded and maintained individually

Package 1

  • Very simple app with a couple of screens and no server connectivity

Package 2

  • More complex app which pulls in content or data from an external web server

Package 3

  • Best-in-class, highly sophisticated app with unique features

Hybrid Apps

Hybrid apps are essentially Web content wrapped in a native container. The primary content for the app is coded in a Web language, such as HTML5. However, the native shell is specific to iOS, Android, or other platform, allowing the app to access some of the device functionality that a native app would be able to do, as well as each specific platform’s user interface design elements. The composition of hybrid apps can vary in terms of the amount of Web content and amount of native device functionality built out. A hybrid app may be easier to maintain and faster to develop than multiple versions of a native app, depending on the app’s purpose and complexity, since the Web content will only need to be coded one time.

Package 1

  • Very simple app with a couple of screens and no server connectivity

Package 2

  • More complex app which pulls in content or data from an external web server

Package 3

  • Best-in-class, highly sophisticated app with unique features